Water & Waste Water

When we think about our water we usually look first to the high quality drinking water and wastewater services that we pay for through our local charges. However the value of our water services  goes far beyond our mains and sewers and contributes to almost all areas of our lives; our personal well-being, the health of our rivers and streams, cleaner beaches, recovering wildlife, new resources, reduced flooding, and a strong economy.

The collection, treatment and distribution of our water all use physical assets. Reservoirs, mains, sewers and treatment works are the most obvious and represent around three-quarters of all assets. However, companies also need pumps, vehicles, IT, remote monitoring, control systems and other equipment. All are essential water industry infrastructure.

The repair and replacement of our underground assets – the mains and sewers, which for decades were fixed only when necessary – is a major challenge and takes a large share of investment.

The UK

Over 99% of the UK population is served by the public water supply while in England and Wales this rises to almost 99.9%, where 30,021 households out of 21,660,475 (0.14%) have private supplies. Each day the UK water industry collects, treats and then supplies more than 17 billion litres of high quality water to domestic and commercial customers and then collects and treats over 16 billion litres of the resulting wastewaters, returning it safely to the environment. The industry is made up of 12 water and sewerage service providers and 14 water suppliers.

Ireland

Across the Republic of Ireland 34 Local Authorities are responsible for water and sewage services. The Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government develops and implements policies and aids the delivery of water services infrastructure.

At present public water supplies and group water supplies produce over 1.7billion cubic metres of drinking water per day.

Worldwide

The modern water industry operates sophisticated and costly water and wastewater networks and sewage treatment plants and typically consumes 1-2% of GDP. It is generally a natural monopoly, and as a result is usually run as a public service by a public utility which is owned by local or national government.

In some countries, notably France, the UK and the Czech Republic, the water industry is regulated but services are largely operated by private companies with exclusive rights for a limited period and a well-defined geographical space.

Portfolio Entries in Water & Waste Water

Archilles Logos RICS Logo
Water & Waste Water,

When we think about our water we usually look first to the high quality drinking water and wastewater services that we pay for through our local charges. However the value of our water services  goes…